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PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 12:21 am 
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Now Old what make is this http://search.digido.org.uk/?id=llgc-id ... ext&page=1


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 12:23 am 
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http://search.digido.org.uk/?id=llgc-id ... ext&page=1

http://search.digido.org.uk/?id=llgc-id ... ext&page=1


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 4:29 am 
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skoda wrote:


Image

Its a Welger AP10 which were imported by Watkins Brothers who evolved into Watvere and Westmac - later owned by Lonhro Group. Watvere had the Fahr and Deutz agency & later on Landini ; Westmac stayed with just implements mainlining on Welger & Tarrup. Both companies now sadly gone.

Image

When I was working for Westmac in the 80's we held a competition to find the oldest working Welger baler. An old farmer from Talgarth near Builth Wells won with one of these string press balers. The baler in this photo comes from near Aberystwyth.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 7:39 pm 
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OLD wrote:
skoda wrote:


Image

Its a Welger AP10 which were imported by Watkins Brothers who evolved into Watvere and Westmac - later owned by Lonhro Group. Watvere had the Fahr and Deutz agency & later on Landini ; Westmac stayed with just implements mainlining on Welger & Tarrup. Both companies now sadly gone.

Image

When I was working for Westmac in the 80's we held a competition to find the oldest working Welger baler. An old farmer from Talgarth near Builth Wells won with one of these string press balers. The baler in this photo comes from near Aberystwyth.
My late father would have known that as he part owned a green Welger with 3 other farmers ,before my time :roll: never saw it myself..

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 2:47 pm 
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skoda wrote:
For some reason this didn't catch on .


This is the McConnell hedge trimmer, first ones released were fitted to Standard Fordsons. One of them on a Standard was restored many years ago and shown on McConnells stand at the Royal Show, its still in their Ludlow warehouse.

The loader is a Horndraulic made by Steel Fabricators in South Wales. The original design was built by a Mr Horn in the USA - SF had the UK licence to build them here.

The Ford badged loaders on the early 1000's series from 1965 onwards were made by Horndraulic.

The tractor registration of CA was a Caernafon, North Wales number.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 2:53 pm 
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skoda wrote:
http://search.digido.org.uk/?id=llgc-id%3a1507519&query=tractor&query_type=full_text&page=2&img_id=1 This sort of did catch on .


The SF back hoe on the MF 35 was also manufactured by Steelfab-Horndraulic.

In the 90's & early 00's SF were manufacturing loaders for MF 300 Series tractors. The company got into financial difficulties, and were taken over by joint venture of Lewis Loaders in Warwickshire {who make compact tractor loaders} & Ted Hopkins Ltd the {then} MF dealer from Newport in Gwent south Wales. For a few years loaders & spares continued to be made at Hopkins yard under the MF name.


Last edited by OLD on Tue Jan 05, 2016 3:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 3:05 pm 
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skoda wrote:


The grain drill was manufactured by H V Mckay in Australia under the Sunshine name. Mckay employed a guy called McCarroll who is credited for designing & perfecting the Header-Stripper grain harvester which they developed into the Worlds' first successful self propelled combine. Massey Harris took on the design rights on the combines, and imported McKay Sunshine binders, grain drills and disc harrows for the UK.

As a teenager in the 60's helping out on local farms I spent days riding on the platform of this type of grain drills. The coulters were raised & lowered by an over-centre lever behind the grain box. The job entailed watching the grain flow into the tubes, a stick was carried to poke into the pipes of they blocked, or clearing a clod of soil/grass blocking the coulters.

Seed grain was still in 2 1/4 cwt hessian sacks {250 Lbs weight} . Sacks were loaded onto a trailer, the sisal twine around the sack neck was cut and grain slowly poured out into a galvanised oval tub to be tipped into the seed hopper.


Last edited by OLD on Tue Jan 05, 2016 3:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 3:08 pm 
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skoda wrote:


I think the crawler is one of the Allis Chalmers models.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 4:44 pm 
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OLD wrote:
skoda wrote:


The grain drill was manufactured by H V Mckay in Australia under the Sunshine name. Mckay employed a guy called McCarroll who is credited for designing & perfecting the Header-Stripper grain harvester which they developed into the Worlds' first successful self propelled combine. Massey Harris took on the design rights on the combines, and imported McKay Sunshine binders, grain drills and disc harrows for the UK.

As a teenager in the 60's helping out on local farms I spent days riding on the platform of this type of grain drills. The coulters were raised & lowered by an over-centre lever behind the grain box. The job entailed watching the grain flow into the tubes, a stick was carried to poke into the pipes of they blocked, or clearing a clod of soil/grass blocking the coulters.

Seed grain was still in 2 1/4 cwt hessian sacks {250 Lbs weight} . Sacks were loaded onto a trailer, the sisal twine around the sack neck was cut and grain slowly poured out into a galvanised oval tub to be tipped into the seed hopper.

That just proves how profligate those farmers were. When I started in Norfolk in 1999, we still used hessian sacks to fill the minimats. However, the string was never cut. It had to be kept and used to tie the next batch. Do well.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 5:00 pm 
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Very interesting topic, lots of things I've never seen before. It's amazing some of the innovation that came from small manufacturers and individuals.

As a side note the National Library of Wales must be a huge place. The books have got to be three times the size of regular books. They can't seem to spell words like "river" without useing all the constants twice.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 8:19 pm 
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OLD wrote:
skoda wrote:
For some reason this didn't catch on .


This is the McConnell hedge trimmer, first ones released were fitted to Standard Fordsons. One of them on a Standard was restored many years ago and shown on McConnells stand at the Royal Show, its still in their Ludlow warehouse.

The loader is a Horndraulic made by Steel Fabricators in South Wales. The original design was built by a Mr Horn in the USA - SF had the UK licence to build them here.

The Ford badged loaders on the early 1000's series from 1965 onwards were made by Horndraulic.

The tractor registration of CA was a Caernafon, North Wales number.


Was there a Loader that could be a front loader or a rear loader that had the frame go back around the axle . I remember a contractor with either an International or a Massey Harris tractor and I remember him saying that the loader could be used in either mode .


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 9:18 pm 
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Was there a Loader that could be a front loader or a rear loader that had the frame go back around the axle . I remember a contractor with either an International or a Massey Harris tractor and I remember him saying that the loader could be used in either mode .[/quote]

Grays of Fetterangus is Scotland made them - in pre cab days.

They were expensive in comparison to the Horndraulic & MIL loaders. The "Rolls Royce" of loaders in that period were Sky-Hi which had taller vertical side frames giving higher lifting height; and long rams which worked in reverse pushing down rather than up hill.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 10:19 pm 
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McFarmer wrote:
Very interesting topic, lots of things I've never seen before. It's amazing some of the innovation that came from small manufacturers and individuals.

As a side note the National Library of Wales must be a huge place. The books have got to be three times the size of regular books. They can't seem to spell words like "river" without useing all the constants twice.


"River" in Welsh is "Afon" :P


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 10:30 pm 
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OLD wrote:
skoda wrote:


The grain drill was manufactured by H V Mckay in Australia under the Sunshine name. Mckay employed a guy called McCarroll who is credited for designing & perfecting the Header-Stripper grain harvester which they developed into the Worlds' first successful self propelled combine. Massey Harris took on the design rights on the combines, and imported McKay Sunshine binders, grain drills and disc harrows for the UK.

As a teenager in the 60's helping out on local farms I spent days riding on the platform of this type of grain drills. The coulters were raised & lowered by an over-centre lever behind the grain box. The job entailed watching the grain flow into the tubes, a stick was carried to poke into the pipes of they blocked, or clearing a clod of soil/grass blocking the coulters.

Seed grain was still in 2 1/4 cwt hessian sacks {250 Lbs weight} . Sacks were loaded onto a trailer, the sisal twine around the sack neck was cut and grain slowly poured out into a galvanised oval tub to be tipped into the seed hopper.


There was a slag drill similar to the ones in the first picture at home until recently, when I sold it to a retired farmer locally who planned to restore it. Probably no co-incidence as those pictures all look to be War-Ag operations and my grandfather was on the Montgomeryshire committee. Much of the steeper ground here was apparently first ploughed by the War Ag using crawlers brought over from the US.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 10:35 pm 
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DaveJ wrote:
McFarmer wrote:
Very interesting topic, lots of things I've never seen before. It's amazing some of the innovation that came from small manufacturers and individuals.

As a side note the National Library of Wales must be a huge place. The books have got to be three times the size of regular books. They can't seem to spell words like "river" without useing all the constants twice.


"River" in Welsh is "Afon" :P



Point made.

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