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 Post subject: Things are looking up
PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2016 9:52 am 
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So, there is now light at the end of the tunnel. Given the current input costs versus returns, the survivors will be in a better position i would say as now, more than ever, people are really tuned into their costs, so it may well be more profitable at 26-27p when it gets there than previously when getting 30-32p and not giving a monkey and controlling costs.

What i think is that even when we hopefully get back up there, still make the buyers life a hard one.

Grahams who buy a lot round here are mean mean bastards. They had to put their "B" quota price up to more tha their "A" price too maintain supply as they are now short, buyers got excited, so he raised their 'A" quota to 90-95% of their production profile so they are only getting top whack for 5-10% of their milk.

Having dealt with them out with milk supply, there's nothing wrong with being shrewd, and plenty wrong with being a miserable streak of shit.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2016 1:26 pm 
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What's a good yield for a dairy cow these days?

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2016 1:36 pm 
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The Pretender wrote:
What's a good yield for a dairy cow these days?

About 5000 burgers.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2016 1:38 pm 
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NQIT wrote:
The Pretender wrote:
What's a good yield for a dairy cow these days?

About 5000 burgers.


Or about 50,000 Tesco slurry burgers.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2016 5:07 pm 
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The Pretender wrote:
What's a good yield for a dairy cow these days?


Quantity determines quality, so 4.2% BF would be around 9,000 litres .. ish ?


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2016 6:11 pm 
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The Squire wrote:
The Pretender wrote:
What's a good yield for a dairy cow these days?


Quantity determines quality, so 4.2% BF would be around 9,000 litres .. ish ?


305 days?

I think dad was doing 8000 ish when he got out 11 years ago.

Do you think yields will plateau?

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2016 9:41 pm 
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Yield depends on system i suppose, and location. Cows out grazing on a lower input system will yield less than those for forced on, but on the right farm will be easier/more cost effective.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2016 11:36 pm 
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My mate Dave's herd was pure Holstein, 220 coos, doing nearly 11,000 litres a year average, but on very expensive rations. When the milk price collapsed, he sold the herd, which happened back in April. He was worried that there would be no market for his type of large framed high yielded that needs an expensive ration to get the milk out.
He reckoned a grass only producer with very low input costs and a long grazing season could make a better profit on a relatively low yield than he could with his monster yielding Holsteins , which are geared for a high milk price . Or someat

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 4:12 am 
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I milked only Illarwarra cows on our farm ( a Australian breed ) sort of based on Ayrshire big red cows they would only do 6000 ltrs average on a pasture based diet our cows were never housed at around 5.6 % BF will do in excess of 13000 on high inputs
In extreme drought we had feed bills twice what the milk check was each month couldnt give the cows away 16 week wait at the slaughter yards
But as they say good always comes from bad what I guess Im trying to say is even with what was a major shock to our farm after a few years of it we learnt how to make money even in these extreme circumstances and if we apply the lessons learnt when it does turn a little bit more you make a bucket load

What we learnt is, its no good chasing production those Holstein cows although they will make a good dollar when times are good, they also loose big bucket load when times arent as good they are a high maintenance cow
Being a pasture based farm matching calving to the spring break was worth a bucket load as well
Most dairy farms in Australia used to dry the whole herd off during winter so we would calve the whole herd in less than six weeks so that matching the milk peak with the pasture peak was critical and then joining the herd to maintain the in calf rate in that tight calving pattern required that pasture growth match as well

Also learnt cows eat 3 - 5 % of there body weight in pasture so a small cow is no good as she cant make any large quantity of milk on pasture alone , I reckon around 450 - 550 kgs live weight is what is best to aim for and spare no expense growing heifers and try to get them as big as you can so they can compete with large cows when they join the herd

I have also learnt I would much rather milk cows on our old farm than grow sugar cane and beans etc up in the tropics

dunno if you blokes like photo's or not so let me know if your all a bit bored of my rubbish

seeya

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 9:05 am 
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Paul, keep posting the pics. They are interesting.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 10:41 am 
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Keep them coming Paul.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 1:41 pm 
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Always like to see photos.

Col and I keep them in a scrapbook and show them to our friends, pretend we have gone places.

That a lift pump for drainage ? My friends will ask.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 6:51 pm 
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Yep keep the photos coming Paul,interesting stuff.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 6:56 pm 
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McFarmer wrote:
Always like to see photos.

Col and I keep them in a scrapbook and show them to our friends, pretend we have gone places.

That a lift pump for drainage ? My friends will ask.


No. It's the dunny. :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 9:10 pm 
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that aint no dunny farmers out here actually most blokes out here dont use the dunny we sort of mark our territory
Yeah thats a pump for drainage of the tail water when flood irrigating had a 2 cylinder Lister 650 RPM direct coupled to the 8 inch pump

this is digging the reuse drain you can see the Stieger and 14 foot scoop when it was finished the to of the tractor was below the paddock

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