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Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Mon Dec 12, 2016 8:39 pm
by Flintstone
footsfitter wrote:Thought you were speaking Brogan- Bingo this, than and everything then see its a D not a B :roll:


Nope. Not a ffuking word. :o

Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 10:00 pm
by RGSP
While I think about it, occasionally it is NOT the livestock owner's responsibility to fence. If you have a frontage onto a public road, the livestock may be driven along that road, full stop, with the exception of motorways and certain roads in London. It is the livestock owner's responsibility, if livestock are driven along a road, to take reasonable steps to try and keep them off adjoining property, but the law recognises that "try" is not the same thing as "ensure", and in the end it is the property owner's responsibility to keep "reasonable" fences and gates alongside the public road. No compensation for hoof marks across an open-plan front lawn!

Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Fri Dec 16, 2016 8:56 am
by Lord Muck
But Raggy isn't wanting to drive them so it's immaterial.
The livestock owner is responsible for keeping the manky fucking maggot taxis in the field and out of his.

Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Tue Dec 20, 2016 11:32 am
by skoda
I expect it is their responsibility if they have stock and you don't ,if you are a NFU member they can tell you exactly what the law is (free of charge)and you will have that to reinforce your argument. They could use 3 strand electric fence , something a lot of temporary landlords insist winter sheep grazers do nowadays .

Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Tue Dec 20, 2016 4:24 pm
by McFarmer
It's interesting over here. Every state has their own laws.

In Iowa on a boundary fence you have the right half, neighbor has the other half, livestock or not.

Many western states have "open range" where the owner has no responsibility. If you don't want them in your property, you fence them out.

If the state doesn't want them on the road, they fence them off.

Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Tue Dec 20, 2016 9:02 pm
by Tel
McFarmer wrote:It's interesting over here. Every state has their own laws.

In Iowa on a boundary fence you have the right half, neighbor has the other half, livestock or not.

Many western states have "open range" where the owner has no responsibility. If you don't want them in your property, you fence them out.

If the state doesn't want them on the road, they fence them off.
When I went horse back riding in Vermont a few years ago the ranch, we were on had a herd or horses the owner knew roughly their location but not exactly, the only fence we saw was against the barns and the local gravel road, otherwise they went where they liked, as we rode round the property a few of the big houses in the woods had fenced to stop them coming on but that was it. Equally even when riding in the trees she knew exactly the line of her property boundary.
It was quite amazing to ride out of the tree line and come across this massive herd of horses grazing in the grassland.
In Arizona a few years later the paddocks were all fenced and we just rode in the desert and hills.

Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Tue Dec 20, 2016 10:59 pm
by footsfitter
Tel wrote:
McFarmer wrote:It's interesting over here. Every state has their own laws.

In Iowa on a boundary fence you have the right half, neighbor has the other half, livestock or not.

Many western states have "open range" where the owner has no responsibility. If you don't want them in your property, you fence them out.

If the state doesn't want them on the road, they fence them off.
When I went horse back riding in Vermont a few years ago the ranch, we were on had a herd or horses the owner knew roughly their location but not exactly, the only fence we saw was against the barns and the local gravel road, otherwise they went where they liked, as we rode round the property a few of the big houses in the woods had fenced to stop them coming on but that was it. Equally even when riding in the trees she knew exactly the line of her property boundary.
It was quite amazing to ride out of the tree line and come across this massive herd of horses grazing in the grassland.
In Arizona a few years later the paddocks were all fenced and we just rode in the desert and hills.

When you got off your horse, did you drink your milk in one go, or show style sipping it gently................. :?

Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Wed Dec 21, 2016 3:24 am
by McFarmer
In most western states if you hit a cow its your fault, no matter where.

Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Wed Dec 21, 2016 3:51 am
by Paul Griffiths
McFarmer wrote:In most western states if you hit a cow its your fault, no matter where.

The law in QLD used to be the same now its only on unfenced roads were cows have the right of way which still would be most of QLD

Paul

Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Thu Dec 22, 2016 7:08 pm
by Flintstone
McFarmer wrote:In most western states if you hit a cow its your fault, no matter where.

Hitting them on the head is usually kindest.

Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Fri Dec 23, 2016 10:08 am
by RGSP
Flintstone wrote:
McFarmer wrote:In most western states if you hit a cow its your fault, no matter where.

Hitting them on the head is usually kindest.
Yes, I know, and with the outside tyre to the port main undercarriage no doubt. But then I am aware of the Norwegian MTB skipper in the 1960s who managed to demolish a cow with his boat. The cow was wading at the time. The boat remained operational, but in need of repair.

Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Fri Dec 23, 2016 10:47 am
by Flintstone

Re: Boundaries and their maintenance.

Posted: Fri Dec 23, 2016 5:17 pm
by The Pretender
Flintstone wrote:Fast forward to 00:35.




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pfZiTDchH0
:(