Autumn happenings

All issues regarding arable farming.
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Coltheox
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Autumn happenings

Post by Coltheox » Sat Oct 07, 2017 1:24 pm

Just got back from Ely. Hellif there ain't a lot of activity going on. Drills of all shapes and sizes roaring up and down fields putting in wheat, I guess.

Land being ploughed, and some early sown crops already up!

Is it just me, or does some of the early sown Oilseed Rape appear so far ahead it looks as if it will flower in November????? :o
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Raggy
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Re: Autumn happenings

Post by Raggy » Sat Oct 07, 2017 4:00 pm

Ive got a neighbouring field of Osr that has totally covered the ground. It looks it was planted at about 20lb/acre. It's next door to my Osr planted at 3lb/acre. About eight to ten inches high. :o
I know I'm far happier with my crop than I would if I was farming the other side of the hedge.
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graybo
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Re: Autumn happenings

Post by graybo » Sat Oct 07, 2017 5:45 pm

Raggy wrote:Ive got a neighbouring field of Osr that has totally covered the ground. It looks it was planted at about 20lb/acre. It's next door to my Osr planted at 3lb/acre. About eight to ten inches high. :o
I know I'm far happier with my crop than I would if I was farming the other side of the hedge.
What are these lb and acre things?
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Raggy
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Re: Autumn happenings

Post by Raggy » Sat Oct 07, 2017 5:49 pm

graybo wrote:
Raggy wrote:Ive got a neighbouring field of Osr that has totally covered the ground. It looks it was planted at about 20lb/acre. It's next door to my Osr planted at 3lb/acre. About eight to ten inches high. :o
I know I'm far happier with my crop than I would if I was farming the other side of the hedge.
What are these lb and acre things?
I'm trying to speak/type in a language that Col understands. :wink:
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Flintstone
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Re: Autumn happenings

Post by Flintstone » Sat Oct 07, 2017 7:38 pm

Raggy wrote:
graybo wrote:
Raggy wrote:Ive got a neighbouring field of Osr that has totally covered the ground. It looks it was planted at about 20lb/acre. It's next door to my Osr planted at 3lb/acre. About eight to ten inches high. :o
I know I'm far happier with my crop than I would if I was farming the other side of the hedge.
What are these lb and acre things?
I'm trying to speak/type in a language that Col understands. :wink:

Bushels, rods and chains then?

Although that does sound like something he might like. :D
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NQIT
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Re: Autumn happenings

Post by NQIT » Sat Oct 07, 2017 7:47 pm

Col, this happens every autumn. Has the Alzheimers kicked in already?
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Coltheox
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Re: Autumn happenings

Post by Coltheox » Tue Oct 17, 2017 7:36 pm

No Alzheimer's as yet, NQIT!!!!!! :D

Got back from Kent late last week. Lots of fields been drilled down there. Oilseed Rape does look thick on many a field.

Around here, several large fields of sugar beet lifted and delivered, and saw two Horscht drills on one field today! They will have sown that by this evening! Looked a good seedbed, too. Carry on like this and it looks like almost wall to wall wheat next year!
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McFarmer
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Re: Autumn happenings

Post by McFarmer » Tue Oct 17, 2017 10:47 pm

Coltheox wrote:No Alzheimer's as yet, NQIT!!!!!! :D

Got back from Kent late last week. Lots of fields been drilled down there. Oilseed Rape does look thick on many a field.

Around here, several large fields of sugar beet lifted and delivered, and saw two Horscht drills on one field today! They will have sown that by this evening! Looked a good seedbed, too. Carry on like this and it looks like almost wall to wall wheat next year!

Over here a lot of wheat is going to feedlots. How does it pay there ?
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Coltheox
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Re: Autumn happenings

Post by Coltheox » Wed Oct 18, 2017 9:26 am

McFarmer wrote:
Coltheox wrote:No Alzheimer's as yet, NQIT!!!!!! :D

Got back from Kent late last week. Lots of fields been drilled down there. Oilseed Rape does look thick on many a field.

Around here, several large fields of sugar beet lifted and delivered, and saw two Horscht drills on one field today! They will have sown that by this evening! Looked a good seedbed, too. Carry on like this and it looks like almost wall to wall wheat next year!

Over here a lot of wheat is going to feedlots. How does it pay there ?
Hell of a lot grown here goes for feed anyway - it's grown for it. Price will depend on availability. Quality not so important, but stlll plays a part.

There is some quality wheat grown for milling and biscuit making and the such like. Class one - Breadmaking. Needs a good protein level. Class two - can be 'blended' into breadmaking varieties. Class three - biscuit making, etc. Class four - split into 'hard' and 'soft' varieties. Some can be blended with higher quality wheats, and some is just out and out feed. The Class four's tend to be the highest yielders, and therefore can be a better bet than 'quality' wheats, particularly in a year when many farmers are attempting to grow 'quality' wheats. That reduces the premium owing to potential over supply.

Most Class four's, and anything that doesn't make specification, will usually go for feed.
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Coltheox
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Re: Autumn happenings

Post by Coltheox » Fri Oct 20, 2017 1:05 pm

Had to trawl over to Newmarket this morning. I made a few observations on both the journey there, and the return, in which I took a different route.

The first thing that struck me is how much land has been sown this autumn. Granted that there is not anywhere near the amount of sugar beet grown as there once was, but even some of the fields of this years former sugar beet are now drilled with wheat, and we have another week of October to go. Whilst there is still some stubble, and some unlifted sugar beet, the amount of land left for potential spring sowing seems on the small side to me.

The second thing that struck me is how well the crops that have emerged actually look. Whether it was Oilseed Rape or Cereal crops, I honestly didn't see a bad crop anywhere. Everything is growing well, and land that has obviously been sown and not yet emerged looks as if it is a good seedbed.

OK, we have a hell of a long way to go before next harvest, and there is plenty of potential for things to go horribly wrong, but in terms of establishment and good seedbeds, I have rarely seen a better year.
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Re: Autumn happenings

Post by The Pretender » Fri Oct 20, 2017 5:59 pm

We are nibbling away at it, but holding off waiting for grass weeds
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Coltheox
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Re: Autumn happenings

Post by Coltheox » Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:46 am

Took a trip to Gods Own County (Yorkshire) a week or so ago. Only just into the East Riding (Beverley) which entailed dragging up through Lincolncestershire.

As I have said before, a hell of a lot of land sown, and I did not see what could be called a bad crop either there or back.

Some Oilseed Rape looks too good, in my opinion, but a few good frosts will cut it back. Wheats look very healthy.

A helluva way to go until next July/August I know, but from what I have seen crops seem off to an excellent start this autumn.
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