Coos

Livestock discussion in here... ("moo", "baaa", "oink")
defender
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Coos

Post by defender » Fri Apr 19, 2019 9:02 pm

A question for anyone having anything to do with cattle . Do you find cattle are getting more unpredictable . There have been a few serious injuries caused by cattle round here, 2 airlift to hospital cases and several broken bones, self included . Today while moving cattle one heifer lost the plot and knocked me off the quad . I was lucky enough to get back on sharpish to get out of her way , got some old cows in to the field and they were quiet as anything
You would need to have a death wish to go near with a dog

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McFarmer
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Re: Coos

Post by McFarmer » Fri Apr 19, 2019 11:06 pm

One strike rule here when we had cows.

Turn on me once and you were gone. About a decade of that, saving all our own females, buying bulls from folks who had the same philosophy and the problems disappeared. Newly calved cows were given some deference. They could shake their heads and I would back off, but a full on charge was grounds for dismissal.

The last females I bought where twelve registered bred heifers. Only six made it to the second year. One would start to stalk you soon as she saw you enter the pasture. Slowly getting closer until she thought she was close enough to charge. I had the little boy with me one time she did that and she didn't finish the week.

Interesting reading about keeping a family unit together, several generations. Seems a herd is more than a group of individuals.
Measure twice, cut once, curse, repeat.

defender
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Re: Coos

Post by defender » Sat Apr 20, 2019 6:45 pm

Yes it's a down the road rule here as well . This one is just 13 months old so will move from the getting kept for breeding to the fattening field.
Some of the older stock still have limmy blood and can be a bit quick , due to change 2 bulls soon so maybe try some shorthorn
Managing to get 400 kg carcass at 20-23 months old so herd performing quite good

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McFarmer
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Re: Coos

Post by McFarmer » Sat Apr 20, 2019 7:06 pm

Limousines have pretty much fallen out of favor here for that reason.

Salers or South Devon are popular breeds to mix in. Shorthorn is also popular. I believe polled individuals are available in all three. Maybe not Shorthorn.

I had a couple South Devons, one was probably my best bull. Had a lot of cows trace back to him.
Measure twice, cut once, curse, repeat.

defender
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Re: Coos

Post by defender » Sat Apr 20, 2019 10:40 pm

I just took over the management of this lot in December so will need a while to see the direction its heading but for the most part it seems ok
I think the biggest problem is lack of human contact as everything is done without the operator getting out of the cab

defender
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Re: Coos

Post by defender » Sat Apr 20, 2019 10:45 pm

At the last place I worked we bought 150 steers to finish with about half limmy's , when they came home it could take 3 or 4 days before I could get out the land rover without them going through the fence , It was madness

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McFarmer
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Re: Coos

Post by McFarmer » Sat Apr 20, 2019 11:05 pm

Cows don’t milk that good either.
Measure twice, cut once, curse, repeat.

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Lord Muck
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Re: Coos

Post by Lord Muck » Mon Apr 22, 2019 7:43 am

A friend of mine has slowly been growing his herd over the last few years and has a strict policy of spending time with his cattle, handling and giving them a good rub and a bit of a natter.
He has people come from all over the UK to buy his animals as they have such good temperaments.
I think you have to invest some time with them (as tight as time is these days) to get good results.
It's a lovely day

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Coltheox
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Re: Coos

Post by Coltheox » Mon Apr 22, 2019 9:38 am

Lord Muck wrote:
Mon Apr 22, 2019 7:43 am
A friend of mine has slowly been growing his herd over the last few years and has a strict policy of spending time with his cattle, handling and giving them a good rub and a bit of a natter.
He has people come from all over the UK to buy his animals as they have such good temperaments.
I think you have to invest some time with them (as tight as time is these days) to get good results.
I agree, LM - but it doesn't always work.

I spent a lot of time when I was married talking to my (then) wife (if I could get a word in) handling her and giving her a rub down - but she still turned out to be a vicious snarly old pisser who I was glad to see the back of........................
Full English Brexit, please!

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McFarmer
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Re: Coos

Post by McFarmer » Mon Apr 22, 2019 12:26 pm

Coltheox wrote:
Mon Apr 22, 2019 9:38 am
Lord Muck wrote:
Mon Apr 22, 2019 7:43 am
A friend of mine has slowly been growing his herd over the last few years and has a strict policy of spending time with his cattle, handling and giving them a good rub and a bit of a natter.
He has people come from all over the UK to buy his animals as they have such good temperaments.
I think you have to invest some time with them (as tight as time is these days) to get good results.
I agree, LM - but it doesn't always work.

I spent a lot of time when I was married talking to my (then) wife (if I could get a word in) handling her and giving her a rub down - but she still turned out to be a vicious snarly old pisser who I was glad to see the back of........................
My cows never liked their tits played with.
Measure twice, cut once, curse, repeat.

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dust n diesel
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Re: Coos

Post by dust n diesel » Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:15 pm

Lord Muck wrote:
Mon Apr 22, 2019 7:43 am
A friend of mine has slowly been growing his herd over the last few years and has a strict policy of spending time with his cattle, handling and giving them a good rub and a bit of a natter.
He has people come from all over the UK to buy his animals as they have such good temperaments.
I think you have to invest some time with them (as tight as time is these days) to get good results.
My brother in law once bought a Limousin cross heifer out the store ring at the mart that nearly cleared the front barrier into the stalls. It looked a great animal for breeding, if a little spirited.

A week or so later the auctioneer came up to see him and asked what he’d done with the wild beast he’d bought, he opened gate into pen, walked upto it and stood and scratched its tail head and rubbed its back. They sometimes just need a little time with people and some handling to calm them.
Please sir, can I have some more?

JM
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Re: Coos

Post by JM » Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:44 pm

My wild one's are generally the type that you cant get close enough for a scratch, got 2 cows left to calve this spring and that will be the lot, bulls not going back in, cows will go fat next winter, I've had enough and want a holiday. 8)
Just a Pembrokeshire twat.

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McFarmer
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Re: Coos

Post by McFarmer » Fri Apr 26, 2019 6:02 pm

JM wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:44 pm
My wild one's are generally the type that you cant get close enough for a scratch, got 2 cows left to calve this spring and that will be the lot, bulls not going back in, cows will go fat next winter, I've had enough and want a holiday. 8)

Really ? Not worth it to sell bred cows in the fall ?

I sold mine bred with a calf at side. Good interest.
Measure twice, cut once, curse, repeat.

JM
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Re: Coos

Post by JM » Fri Apr 26, 2019 6:24 pm

McFarmer wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 6:02 pm
JM wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:44 pm
My wild one's are generally the type that you cant get close enough for a scratch, got 2 cows left to calve this spring and that will be the lot, bulls not going back in, cows will go fat next winter, I've had enough and want a holiday. 8)

Really ? Not worth it to sell bred cows in the fall ?

I sold mine bred with a calf at side. Good interest.
To be honest I dont think most of them are good enough to sell on. It would probably be a lot more hassle as well.
Just a Pembrokeshire twat.

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footsfitter
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Re: Coos

Post by footsfitter » Fri Apr 26, 2019 6:46 pm

JM wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:44 pm
My wild one's are generally the type that you cant get close enough for a scratch, got 2 cows left to calve this spring and that will be the lot, bulls not going back in, cows will go fat next winter, I've had enough and want a holiday. 8)
from the way you post over a year, giving up spuds would enable you have Raggy quantities of holidays :o
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